Chaos and calm in the lecture theatre: Transforming the lecture by creating and sustaining interactivity at scale part 1

The use of lectures has been a long debated practice in the design of teaching and learning in higher education, despite its relatively ubiquitous status as the at-scale pedagogy de rigueur for most institutions (see Webster, 2015; Gibbs, 1982; and Nordmann et al., 2021 for some examples). Successive waves of trendy and often transient pedagogicalContinue reading “Chaos and calm in the lecture theatre: Transforming the lecture by creating and sustaining interactivity at scale part 1”

Reimagining First Year Accounting with a Practical Connection

How can we connect with students who have little business experience and ensure they develop the necessary skills to become capable professionals? As business academics and practitioners, we grapple with this issue every semester. At the end of 2022, we presented our story of making practical connections with students at the ASCILITE Conference. The PractitionerContinue reading “Reimagining First Year Accounting with a Practical Connection”

Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome!

Some of you might remember the phrase from Cabaret – ‘In any and every language, Welcome!’ If the pandemic taught us anything, it was the value of seeing and hearing from our students rather than talking to blank screens. You may have tried inviting (or even pleading with) students to turn on their cameras. ButContinue reading “Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome!”

An integrated approach to complex learning through partnership pedagogy and leadership in action

Employability is a key priority for the University of Sydney Business School, and the university more broadly. This is highlighted by the university receiving consistently high rankings, 1st in Australia and 4th in the world recently. Our students are expected to engage in a developmental process resulting in new and more complex ways of thinkingContinue reading “An integrated approach to complex learning through partnership pedagogy and leadership in action”

At Scale Immersive Learning ‘Events’

There is growing consensus that didactic lectures are primarily a thing of the past and more active and collaborative delivery methods provide deeper and long lasting learning. In this blog post, Peter Bryant (Jan, 2022) details the causes and effects of magnification and multiplication in higher education. Bryant describes solutions such as Connected Learning asContinue reading “At Scale Immersive Learning ‘Events’”

Parallel Projects: High-impact, low-risk interdisciplinary learning

Interdisciplinary effectiveness, defined as “the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries” is one of the nine Graduate Qualities that we aim to help our students to develop at the University of Sydney. However, offering programs that fully realise this goal can be complex, and resource intensive. Opportunities doContinue reading “Parallel Projects: High-impact, low-risk interdisciplinary learning”

Cultivating entrepreneurs and innovators through connected learning

Connected learning is an approach that seeks to combine personal interests, supportive relationships, and opportunities (Ito et al., 2013). It emphasizes that learning should be an integrated experience situated within a matrix of contexts including formal and informal, local and global, embodied and virtual, as well as distributed and integrated (Brown & Renshaw, 2006). PriorContinue reading “Cultivating entrepreneurs and innovators through connected learning”

The virtues (and pitfalls) of student-to-student feedback – a reflection

In corridor discussions and conversations at symposia, I have often engaged in lively debates around the appropriateness of the use of student peer review i.e. student-to-student feedback specifically around in-class presentation assessments. Challenge If you work within a qualitative unit, you are acutely aware of the challenges these workshops/tutorials pose. Groups have been working onContinue reading “The virtues (and pitfalls) of student-to-student feedback – a reflection”

Exit mobile version